What is: Sampling like in the 90s?

What is: Sampling like in the 90s?

The 1990s was a decade of great innovation and experimentation in the world of electronic music production. One of the most significant developments of the decade was the rise of music sampling, which allowed producers and musicians to incorporate elements of existing songs and recordings into their own creations.

Sampling had been around for a while, but it was in the 90s that it truly came into its own. The development of affordable and user-friendly sampling technology made it possible for a wide range of artists to experiment with the technique, from electronic musicians to techno producers. Sampling also played a major role in the rise of genres like trip-hop, acid jazz, and drum and bass.

One of the most significant figures in music sampling during the 90s was electronic musician Aphex Twin. His 1991 album "Selected Ambient Works 85-92" was a groundbreaking release that incorporated elements of ambient, techno and industrial music. The album featured a number of samples, including the track "Green Calx" which was built around a sample from the song "Vortex" by Tangerine Dream. The album was a critical and commercial success, and it helped to establish Aphex Twin as one of the most innovative electronic musicians of the decade.

Another important figure in music sampling during the 90s was the British trip-hop group Massive Attack. Their 1991 album "Blue Lines" was a groundbreaking release that incorporated elements of soul, funk, and electronic into a new genre that would come to be known as trip-hop. The album featured a number of samples, including the iconic "Unfinished Sympathy" which was built around a sample from the 1981song "Nassau" by Phuture. The song was a huge hit and helped to establish trip-hop as a genre.

In the techno world, artists like Plastikman and The Orb were experimenting with sampling. Plastikman's 1993 album "Musik" was a groundbreaking release that incorporated elements of minimal techno and acid house. The album featured a number of samples, including the track "Spastik" which was built around a sample from the song "Spastik" by Plastikman. The album was a critical and commercial success, and it helped to establish Plastikman as one of the most innovative techno musicians of the decade.

The Orb's 1992 album "U.F.Orb" was a groundbreaking release that incorporated elements of ambient and dub. The album featured a number of samples, including the track "Blue Room" which was built around a sample from the song "Blue Room" by The Orb. The album was a critical and commercial success, and it helped to establish The Orb as one of the most innovative electronic musicians of the decade.

 

What were some popular hardware samplers?

In terms of hardware sampler, some of the most popular and widely used samplers of the 90s include the Yamaha A4000, Akai S900, the E-mu SP-1200 and the Ensoniq ASR-10. The Akai S900 was one of the first affordable and widely used samplers of the decade, it was popular among hip-hop and electronic music producers. The E-mu SP-1200 was another popular sampler of the decade, it was known for its gritty sound and was widely used in the creation of hip-hop and electronic music. The Ensoniq ASR-10 was a more advanced and versatile sampler, it was popular among electronic music producers, and it was known for its high-quality sound and advanced features.

In conclusion, music sampling in the 90s was a significant development that allowed producers and musicians to incorporate elements of existing songs and recordings into their own creations, and it played a major role in the rise of many genres like trip-hop, acid jazz, and drum and bass. Artists like Aphex Twin, Massive Attack, Dhevolver and The Orb were some of the most prominent figures experimenting with sampling during the 90s, and their music continues to be appreciated and celebrated today.

 

Legal sampling problems today?

Music sampling is still a popular technique used in modern music production, however, it also involves legal issues that can be complex.

One of the main legal issues with sampling is copyright infringement. In order to use a sample from a pre-existing recording in your own music, you must obtain permission from the copyright holder, which is typically the record label or the artist. This can be a difficult and time-consuming process, and it can also be expensive, as the copyright holder may charge a fee for the use of the sample.

Another legal issue with sampling is the concept of "fair use." Fair use is a legal doctrine that allows for the use of copyrighted material without permission under certain circumstances, such as for the purpose of criticism, commentary, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, or research. However, the determination of fair use is highly dependent on the circumstances of each individual case, and it can be difficult to know whether a particular use of a sample qualifies as fair use.

Additionally, the use of samples in music can also lead to legal disputes over who owns the rights to the music. In some cases, multiple parties may claim ownership of a sample and/or the rights to a particular recording, making it difficult for an artist to obtain permission to use it.

In general, it is advisable for musicians and producers to get clearance from the copyright holder before using any sample in their music to avoid any legal disputes. Many sample libraries and software also offer pre-cleared samples, but it's always better to check before using it.

In short, while sampling is a powerful tool for music production, it's important to be aware of the legal issues surrounding it and to obtain permission before using any samples in your music.

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